Curriculum

Home / Curriculum

Overview

Based on a semester system, students must complete 4 years (8 semesters) or longer in high school (Grade 9-12) with 51 credits in order to be eligible to graduate.

Students take 7 classes in 2 days (A day, B day) with each class meeting for 80 minutes. 

Transfer students may be granted credits for courses approved by the GPA from previous school grades. 

AP course can be completed by consulting with a school counselor after completion of the course.

GPA Standard High School Curriculum

English/Language Arts

Core Courses (year-long):
Introduction to Literature, World Literature, American Literature 

Elective Courses (semester-long):
Film as Literature, Contemporary Literature, Modern Literature, British Literature, Classical Literature

Mathematics

Algebra I, Geometry, Algebra II, Pre-Calculus, Calculus, Statistics

Science

Core Courses (year-long):
Physical Science, Biology, Chemistry, Physics, AP Biology, AP Chemistry

Elective Courses (semester-long):
Environmental Science, Human Anatomy & Physiology, Medicine & Disease

Social Studies

Core Courses (year-long):
Ancient History, Modern History, U.S. History

Elective Courses (semester-long):
World History: Asian Studies, Sociology, Psychology, Economics, Political Science, AP Psychology, AP Microeconomics, AP Macroeconomics

Technology

Computer Science Discoveries, AP Computer Science Principles

Second Language

Chinese1, Chinese 2

Fine/Performing Arts

Art:
Introduction to Art, Drawing & Painting, Visual Art, Illustration, Digital Art & Design, Sculpture

Music:
Introduction to Music, Symphonic Orchestra, Chamber Ensemble, Music Appreciation 1: Classical, Music Appreciation 2: Contemporary, Music Technology, Music Composition

Health

Health/P.E.

AP Courses

Literature, Calculus A / B, Economics, Environmental Science, Biology, Chemistry, Physics, History, Computer Science A (Java), Computer Science Principles (JavaScript)

ESL

ESL Extensive Reading, ESL Writing & Grammar ESL Speaking/Listening, ESL Science, ESL Math, ESL Social Studies

Proposed Study Sequence

ESL

Semester 1

Semester 2

Reading

Reading

Grammar & Writing

Grammar & Writing

Speaking & Listening

Speaking & Listening

ESL Social Studies

ESL Social Studies

ESL Science

ESL Science

Mainstram Math, Music or Art

Mainstram Math, Music or Art

9th Grade

4 Core Courses

3 Elective Courses

English

Social Studies

Math

Science

Electives

English

Health/PE

Introduction to Literature

Ancient History

Dependent on MAP Test/Previous Math
Course

Physical Science

This is student choice

Social Studies

Technology

Algebra 1

Health/PE*

Math

Art/Music

Geometry

Technology*

 Science

 Foreign Language

 Algebra 2

Art/Music

Foreign Language

10th Grade

4 Core Courses

3 Elective Courses

English

Social Studies

Math

Science

Electives

English

Health/PE

World Literature

Modern History

Dependent on MAP Test/Previous Math
Course

Biology

This is student choice

Social Studies

Technology

Geometry

Health/PE*

Math

Art/Music

Algebra 2

Technology*

 Science

 Foreign Language

 Pre-Calculus

Art/Music

Foreign Language

11th Grade

4 Core Courses

3 Elective Courses

English

Social Studies

Math

Science

Electives

English

Core Subjects Electives

American Literature

US History

Dependent on MAP Test/Previous Math
Course

Chemistry

This is student choice

Social Studies

Technology

English Elective

Social Studies Elective

Algebra 2

Physics

Technology

Math

Art/Music

Pre-Calculus

AP Biology

Art/Music

 Science

 Foreign Language

AP Calculus AB

AP Chemistry

Foreign Language

12th Grade

4 Core Courses

3 Elective Courses

English

Social Studies

Math

Science

Electives

English

Core Subjects Electives

English Elective(s)

Social Studies Elective(s)

Dependent on MAP Test/Previous Math
Course

Chemistry

This is student choice

Social Studies

Technology

Can opt out if met the minimum credit
requirement

Algebra 2

Physics

Technology

Math

Art/Music

Pre-Calculus

AP Biology

Art/Music

 Science

 Foreign Language

AP Calculus AB

AP Chemistry

Foreign Language

Can opt out if met the minimum credit
requirement

Can opt out if met the minimum credit
requirement

 

 

Graduation Requirements

In order to graduate from the school or to participate in graduation activities and ceremonies, a student must be eligible for the diploma or certificate and be free of pending major disciplinary action.

Credit Standard

Students are required to attend eight semesters of high school in 9th through 12th grades and complete a minimum of 51 semester credits for graduation. These 51 credits must satisfy the specific departmental requirements described below:

Department Credits

Department

Credits

Language Arts

8

Mathematics

6

Science

6

Social Studies

7

Health/P.E.

2

Fine / Performing Arts

4

Technology / Computer

2

Foreign Language

4

Electives

13

Grades

Academic standards are high at GPA, and new students may find that expectations are higher than at their previous schools. The grading scale at GPA is as follows:

Percentage

Letter

GPA

93~100

A

4.00

90~92.9

A-

3.67

87~89.9

B+

3.33

83~86.9

B

3.00

80~82.9

B-

2.67

77~79.9

C+

2.33

73~76.9

C

2.00

70~72.9

C-

1.67

67~69.9

D+

1.33

63~66.9

D

1.00

60~62.9

D-

0.67

0~59.9

F

0.00

 

Course Name

Course Description

Introduction to Literature


Shakespeare? Poetry? Oh no...oh yes! Feel like a genius when you can tell your friends and relatives about the internal rhyme scheme of “The Raven” or what “...wherefore art thou Romeo?” really means. Learn the basics of the writing process, develop critical thinking skills which you can apply to ANY subject, and express yourself creatively. Are you ready? Let’s go!

World Literature


Discover epic poetry, tragicomedy, biography, and other examples from the literature canon.  Choose from 1000s of options to individualize your learning.  Write essays, record video presentations and develop interview transcripts and demonstrate your mastery of the best novels, poems, non-fiction, and theatre texts in human history.  

American Literature


Sail the high seas with Melville, head into the wilds of Alaska with Krakauer, fly a starship across the galaxy with Asimov, stare down monsters with King, experience the beauty of everyday life in Harlem with Hughes, and play chess with Amy Tan. Through film, novels, poetry, and the most American of literary forms, the short story, explore American life and culture. Write essays, make videos, and do creative projects to figure out--what is America?

Film as Literature


Go back to the future with Marty McFly, travel into the spirit world with Chihiro, follow Kyunwoo as he  chases his sassy girl, outsmart the T-Rex with Dr. Grant, journey across space and time with Cooper aboard the Endurance, and so much more. Learn and apply the basic concepts of studying literature by watching some of the greatest and most entertaining films ever produced.

Contemporary Literature/Modern Literature


Choose from 1000s of options to individualize your learning.  Write essays, record video presentations and develop interview transcripts and demonstrate your mastery of novels, short stories, poetry, music lyrics, movie screenplays, stage plays, non-fiction, and graphic novels.

English Literacy


Develop the four skills in a course designed for your individual level.  Study grammar, idioms, vocabulary and the areas of English which are most relevant for you.  Use comics / graphic novels and other visual texts to grow your enjoyment of the biggest international language.

Course Name

Course Description

Pre-Algebra


In the Pre-Algebra course, you will explore proportional relationships and use number lines and coordinate planes to reason with integers. You’ll develop fluency writing, interpreting, and translating between various forms of linear equations and inequalities, and using them to solve problems. You’ll learn about the laws of exponents to the creation and solution of simple exponential equations.  Data and probability topics will allow students hands-on learning to develop intuitive reasoning to solve a variety of challenging problems.  Quadratic functions will be introduced in the final section of the course.

Algebra 1


This course forms the foundation for all subsequent math courses. This is a function- based course that develops the structure of the real number system in a variety of ways along with the language of mathematics. Students will learn to solve and graph linear equations and inequalities, translate among and use algebraic, tabular, and graphical methods to represent linear and quadratic functions and to solve systems of equations. Students will investigate, describe, and predict the effects of changes on the graphs of linear and quadratic functions and relate direct variation to linear functions and solve problems involving proportional change. Data analysis and statistical computations are explored along with probability theory. Students are taught to use algebra with many real life applications and the appropriate use of graphing calculators.

Geometry


Geometry is a course designed to develop thinking skills, logical problem solving, application of algebraic skills to geometric problems, and proofs based on deductive reasoning. Students use coordinate, transformational, and axiomatic approaches to develop an understanding of a variety of concepts including polygon congruence, similarity, angle relationships in polygons and circles, parallel and perpendicular lines, and the relationships between three dimensional figures. Students develop and apply formulas including distance, midpoint, perimeter, area, surface area, and volume. Applications of geometric concepts to problem solving using algebra and trigonometry are also stressed. 

Algebra 2


Algebra 2 extends the concepts learned in Algebra 1 to the complex number system. Emphasis is placed on the study of functions, graphing, factoring, and solving equations within the field of complex numbers (square root functions, rational functions, and exponential and logarithmic functions). The study of trigonometry is expanded to include all 6 trigonometric functions, and formulas for the Law of Sines and Cosines. Numerous real world applications are used to introduce and develop deeper understanding of the topics studied, along with the use of graphing calculators to enhance understanding. 

Pre-Calculus


Pre-calculus integrates the topics of trigonometry, elementary analysis, and analytic geometry to represent mathematical situations, to express, generate, and study mathematical concepts and the relationships among them. The topics covered in pre-calculus are necessary for success in physics and calculus. Emphasis is placed on fundamental trigonometric properties and the study of functions and relations. Additional emphasis is placed on applications of the trigonometric functions; graphs of higher degree, algebraic, trigonometric, polar, and rational functions and relations; limits; and vector and geometric applications in the plane and space. Focus is on higher-level skills necessary to prepare students for Advanced Placement Calculus. Students who wish to leave open the option of taking calculus in college should include pre-calculus in their high school program.


AP Calculus AB


AP Calculus AB is the study of limits, derivatives, definite and indefinite integrals, and the Fundamental Theorem of Calculus . Consistent with the AP philosophy, concepts will be expressed and analyzed geometrically, numerically, analytically, and verbally.  The use of technology is included throughout the course, which is consistent with the AP Calculus philosophy of the College Board.  The main goal is to prepare students for success on the AP exam in May each year.

Course Name

Course Description


Physical Science A/B


Physical Science is the study of the world around you. Our topics will include Astronomy (study of outer space), History of Earth (study of earth formation, techniques, and fossils), Geology (study of rocks, earthquakes, volcanoes, and plate tectonics), and Mineralogy (study of minerals, rock cycle, and earth’s crust). This course will use hands-on experimentation, activities, and direct instruction. You will learn the ‘how’ and ‘why’, not just the ‘what’ of science. I will show how earth Science is relevant in your everyday life; you must provide the willingness to learn.

Biology A/B


Students enrolled in Biology A/B will attempt to understand what life is and its governing processes by examining life from several angles, ranging from genetics to evolution to biochemistry. A successful completion of this course, together with Biology B, will give students the knowledge and hands-on laboratory skills required to pursue upper-level biology courses, such as neurobiology, microbiology, molecular genetics, and medicine.

Chemistry A/B


Students registered in Chemistry A/B will be introduced to the following topics over the 36 school week period: (a) Foundation of Chemistry, (b) A Brief History of Chemistry, (c) Mole, Limiting Reagents and Percent Weight, (d) Combustion and Oxidation-Reduction Reactions, (e) Exploring Physical Properties of Matter, (f) Gas Laws, (g) Electrons in Atom and the Trends in Periodic Table, (h) Acids and Bases, (i) Nuclear Chemistry and (j) A Brief Tour of Organic Chemistry. Please note that this is a guideline only; the topics listed here may not be covered due to school-related schedule changes.

Physics A/B


This course provides a first introduction to physics. Students will examine topics involving motion in one dimension, Newton's Laws, work, energy and power. Further topics include properties of waves and the Laws of Reflection and Refraction. Students will be given opportunities to do problem solving, analyzing graphs and lab work will be emphasized.  By the end of the course students will have a better understanding and appreciation of the physical world around us.

Environmental Science


The daily warnings in the media about pollution, climate change, and dwindling resources have opened the eyes of the general public to the importance of environmental science.  Our natural environment plays a crucial role in human social and economic life.  By understanding the complex interaction between humans and natural cycles found on earth it is hoped the students will be able to gain an understanding of how fragile and precious the earth is. The goal of the course is to help students to be able to think critically and to be able to independently analyze environmental data in a realistic way that enables the students to have a positive influence on tomorrow's Earth.

Medicine & Disease


This is a newly introduced course currently in development. A detailed course description will follow soon. The department is not sure whether to keep MD.

AP Biology


It is natural for us to be curious about living and nonliving things because we are one of those living things.  Additionally, learning biology is crucial to our understanding of the theory of evolution, genetics, biotechnology while learning how our bodies work. Students will learn about and investigate common scientific concepts and theories relating to the field of biology.  Students will complete a variety of different projects and labs.  

Course Name

Course Description

Ancient History


Students in Ancient History will expand their understanding of history by studying the people and events that led to the start of the major Western and non-Western ancient civilizations. Geography is of special significance in the development of the human story. Continued emphasis is placed on the everyday lives, problems, and accomplishments of people, their role in developing social, economic, and political structures, as well as in establishing and spreading ideas that helped transform the world forever. Students will develop higher levels of critical thinking by considering why civilizations developed where and when they did, why they became dominant, and why they declined. Students will analyze the interactions among the various cultures, emphasizing their enduring contributions and the link, despite time, between the contemporary and ancient worlds. 

Modern History


Students in Modern History will study major turning points that shaped the modern world, from the late eighteenth century into the twentieth century, including the cause and course of the first world war. They will trace the rise of democratic ideas and develop an understanding of the historical roots of current world issues, especially as they pertain to international relations. They will extrapolate from the American experience that democratic ideals are often achieved at a high price, remain vulnerable, and are not practiced everywhere in the world. Students will develop an understanding of current world issues and relate them to their historical, geographic, political, economic, and cultural contexts. Students will consider multiple accounts of events in order to understand international relations from a variety of perspectives. 

U.S. History


In this class, we will examine the history of the United States from the American Revolution to Donald Trump (Yeah, we have a lot of history to uncover). We will take a close look at social, cultural, economic and political factors that played a major part in various transformations of the United States. Using chronology as a framework, this course will focus on major themes, issues, and circumstances that continue to matter in the history of the United States — including environmental transformation; colonialism; immigration; economic development; slavery, “race,” and ethnicity; ideas and practices of freedom and equality; civil and human rights; technological innovation and transformation.

World History: Asian Studeis


This course offers an introduction to Asian studies, the interdisciplinary field dedicated to understanding Asia through its complex and dynamic cultures, past and present. By learning about the history, religion, literature, politics, and popular culture of Asia, students will begin to see beyond commonplace perspectives and generalizations, gaining the skills to think in critical and informed ways about Asia and its place in the world. Students will learn to foreground Asian voices and perspectives in the study of Asian cultures, and they will reflect on the ways in which issues such as colonization, nation-building, and gender shape contemporary Asia and its many representations. Through this course, students will be introduced to current research in the field of Asian studies, and they will carry out a small independent research project. 

Economics


Students will delve into fundamental economic concepts, applying the tools (graphs, statistics, equations) from other subject areas to the understanding of operations and institutions of economic systems. Studied in a historic context are the basic economic principles of micro- and macroeconomics, international economics, comparative economic systems, measurement, and methods. 

Sociology


This course aims to provide students with comprehensive knowledge and relevant skills in the field of sociology in preparation for more advanced educational exploration into the subject and application to real life experiences.  By investigating classical and contemporary sociological theorists, students can apply critical perspectives of sociology to evaluate social groups, institutions, and problems.  The process of socialization occurs for individuals in different ways and through various life stages, and the agents contributing to socialization are essential to this study.  In every society, individuals are stratified by social class; recognizing the classification and impact of social class is a complex and rich subject explored as a way to understand why individuals are treated differently based on their background.  As students examine how society operates and how its people behave, they explore topics including: culture, socialization, crime, deviance, race and ethnicity, gender and sexuality, global inequality, social movements and social change. 


Psychology


This course focuses on individual behavior and why an individual thinks, feels, and reacts to certain stimuli. Major emphasis will be placed on research methods, stages in childhood and adolescence, how the brain works, altered states of consciousness, drugs, psychological testing, and psychological disorders.


AP Psychology


Welcome to AP Psychology! This course focuses on individual behavior and why an individual thinks, feels, and reacts to certain stimuli. This course will prepare you for the AP Psychology exam by following the College Board's AP Psychology Course and Exam Guide to meet the course objectives.


AP Macroeconomics


AP Macroeconomics is a college-level course that introduces students to the principles that apply to an economic system as a whole. The course places particular emphasis on the study of national income and price-level determination. It also develops students’ familiarity with economic performance measures, the financial sector, stabilization policies, economic growth, and international economics. Students learn to use graphs, charts, and data to analyze, describe, and explain economic concepts. 


AP Microeconomics


AP Microeconomics is a college-level course that introduces students to the principles of economics that apply to the functions of individual economic decision-makers. The course also develops students’ familiarity with the operation of product and factor markets, distributions of income, market failure, and the role of government in promoting greater efficiency and equity in the economy. Students learn to use graphs, charts, and data to analyze, describe, and explain economic concepts. 

Art

Course Name

Course Description

Drawing & Painting 1&2


This course will include western art-history, (antiquity-modern), formal analysis in forms of essays and presentations. It will tie the research and history to practical applications and media. 
Drawing in constructed perspective with vanishing points, free drawing and sketching techniques. Collaged and Mixed Media Canvases, as well as classical painting with acrylic or watercolor.
Bookbinding and sketchbook creations. Drawing with pencils, graphite, pastels and crayons. Blending and shading techniques, as well as grid enlargement and copying from photos.

Visual Art 1&2


Visual Art covers the modern art period and offers a wide approach to artistic creation. From traditional sculpting to abstract painting, installation and performance art. Mixed Media Art, Video, Projection, Woodcutting, Printing etc. Visual Art follows a more unconventional technique approach compared to the more traditional Drawing & Painting and Sculpture classes, and will incorporate more “unusual” materials.   

Digital Art & Design 1&2


Digital Art is essential for the game and movie industries as they are one of the fastest growing markets, giving kids a head start into the world of digital creation is essential in this day and age. We will cover a broad range of software for newcomers. More advanced students can deepen their knowledge in specific fields.
Software used:
-Blender:
We will cover 3D-modelling and sculpting, from real world objects to imaginary forms. These objects will be textured and rendered to appear photorealistic. They can also be used as assets in animation or video projects. This sounds hard, but even beginners can achieve great results fast.
Animation, Motion Tracking and Capture, CGI and VFX can be tackled by more advanced students as well.
-Krita:
Digital collage and painting will be handled with Krita. Layers, effects, cutting, combining, multiplying and sequencing are possible in Krita. Students can venture in classic frame by frame animation as well
-Inkscape:
Vector-based illustrations, for logos, posters, banners and print. Layout and graphic design are key elements for this. 
Other:
Cakewalk: for Audio-recording and composing (if necessary for animation or video purposes)
Meshmixer: for 3D-Printing

Illustration


Visualizing data, illustrating poetry and stories are only some of the many possibilities this course can venture into. Comics and webtoons are another important aspect. This course is split between analog and digital. The process of sketching, planning and inking often takes place on paper, professional artists then scan, enhance and process their analog art digitally, adding text and working on layout.

Introduction to Art


We explore the basic elements of art: line, plane, color, shape and format. 
Constructed Perspective with one, two or three vanishing points, as well as isometric and dimetric projection. 
Art related vocabulary, e.g. hue, saturation, stroke, contrast, composition, quality etc. 
This course is supplemented with examples of contemporary art history and practice.

Sculpture 1&2


From abstract to modern and traditional techniques, the kids will learn the basics of three dimensional art. This course will also cover Art history, specifically for sculpture and architecture.
We will use wire, plaster, paperclay, foam cutting, papercraft and wood.
Woodcut printing and stencils can be used to create serial art.

Course Name

Course Description

Introduction to Music


Introduction to Music is designed to increase the student’s enjoyment and understanding of music. This class assists the student in listening to, recognizingand synthesizing elements that can apply to any musical work. The student discovers various genres of music as well as music of other periods and cultures.

Symphonic Orchestra


This class is designed to enhance a wide range of academic and practical skills in musical comprehension. Each class is composed of 40% of listening & theory and  the remaining 60% consists of performance practice. As an integral part of this class, the students are expected to listen to a variety of genre of music
and distinguish composers, historical eras, and musical styles.

Chamber Ensembles


This class is designed to enhance a wide range of academic and practical skills in musical comprehension. Each class is composed of 50% of performance practice, 30% of listening, and 20% of basic music theory and ear-training. Since performance is an integral part of musical study, each student must perform on the recital.

Music Appreciation 1 - Baroque & Classical 


This class is designed to give students a basic understanding of music and to inspire an appreciation for music from a variety of genres and cultures. We will apply the elements of music to our favorite music and investigate how music has changed throughout history. Students will demonstrate their knowledge through various hands-on activities, including a presentation on a Western Art Music composer of their choice.

Music Appreciation 2 - Romantic & Contemporary 


This class is designed to give students a basic understanding of music and to inspire an appreciation for music from a variety of genres and cultures. We will apply the elements of music to our favorite music and investigate how music has changed throughout history. Students will demonstrate their knowledge through various hands-on activities, including a presentation on a Western Art Music composer of their choice.

Music Technology


The purpose of this class is to increase students musical awareness through technology-based experiences. Students will develop musicianship in a 21st century environment by completing projects, utilizing critical response, reading and notation, improvisation and composition as well as some singing and instrumental performance.

Course Name

Course Description

ESL Extensive Reading


The purpose of this course is to give students a foundation in the reading skills needed for mainstream, grade-level coursework. The course consists primarily of independent work, enabling instruction to be tailored to a student’s individual reading level and interests. Skills that students learn in this course include identifying the main idea and details of a text, using reading comprehension strategies, summarizing and synthesizing content, and building stamina as readers.

ESL Speaking/Listening


The purpose of this course is to help students improve the communication skills needed for mainstream, grade-level coursework. The focus is on providing as many opportunities as possible for students to participate in conversation with the teacher and each other. Skills that students learn in this course include discussing familiar topics in conversation, giving effective presentations, using clear pronunciation and good grammar in speech, and building stamina as speakers and listeners.

ESL Writing/Grammar


The purpose of this course is to give students a foundation in the grammar and writing skills needed for mainstream, grade-level coursework. The curriculum is focused on mastering basic concepts and skills, such as subject-verb agreement, sentence structure, writing at the paragraph level, and building stamina as writers.

ESL Social Studies


This course provides an entry level analysis of the world’s ancient civilizations. Special accommodations are provided for english language skill development in reading, writing, speaking and listening.  Students will learn about the people and events that helped shape civilizations of the world.  This course will place emphasis on the everyday lives, problems, and various accomplishments of early civilizations as well as their role in developing social, economic, and political structures, which connect the ancient and contemporary worlds.

ESL Science


The purpose of this course is to prepare students for mainstream, grade-level science coursework. In this course, students will reinforce scientific concepts that are likely to already be familiar to them, while learning the appropriate content-area vocabulary. Students also practice nonfiction reading, academic writing, and scholastic discussion, building their English literacy skills in this content area.

Course Name

Course Description

MS English A/B/C/D


In the Middle School ELA classroom, lessons are aligned with California Common Core state standards, and students prepare for high school English literature/language arts courses. Skills that students learn in these courses include reading and responding to grade-level appropriate literature and nonfiction works; writing expository, narrative, and persuasive essays; learning and using advanced vocabulary; and becoming lifelong readers. 

MS Social Studies A/B/C/D


This course provides an in-depth study and analysis of the world’s ancient civilizations.  Students will learn about the people and events that helped shape the major Western and non-Western civilizations of the world.  This course will begin with the Middle Ages and end at the Enlightenment Significant emphasis will be placed on the everyday lives, problems, and various accomplishments of these civilizations as well as their role in developing social, economic, and political structures, which connect the ancient and contemporary worlds. Following California Common Core standards, this course is designed to provide learning opportunities that will assist students to:

Explore and understand various different societies;
Examine historical actors, the lives they led, and the decisions they made;
Practice and understand reasoning and arguments;
Identify how and why social studies is significant in our daily lives;
Engage primary source evidence and identify continuity and change;
Gain a deeper understanding and appreciation of social studies and indeed, society;
Become more informed, responsible democratic citizens.

MS Science A/B


The course is designed to help students understand the basic principles of Chemistry and Biology through experimentation and investigation.  Students will be encouraged to think creatively and broadly linking the ideas from the text book and lessons to real world situations.  The course is also designed to help the students in preparation for more advanced courses such as IGCSE biology and IGCSE chemistry.

Course Name

Course Description

Computer Science Discoveries A&B


Computer Science Discoveries is an introductory computer science course for 6 - 10th grade students. Mapped to CTSA standards, the course takes a wide lens on computer science by covering topics such as problem solving, programming, physical computing, user centered design, and data, while inspiring students as they build their own websites, apps, animations, games, and physical.
 

AP Computer Science Principles


Computer Science Principles introduces students to the foundational concepts of computer science and challenges them to explore how computing and technology can impact the world. More than a traditional introduction to programming, it is a rigorous, engaging, and approachable course that explores many of the foundational ideas of computing so all students understand how these concepts are transforming the world we live in. The course covers a broad range of foundational topics such as programming, algorithms, the internet, big data, digital privacy and security, and the societal impacts of computing. (from code.org)

Course Name

Course Description

Chinese 1 A/B


Chinese 1 is mainly offered to students without any Chinese language basis. The major objective is to learn basic communication skills and expressions in Chinese. key topics include greetings, time and place, shopping, accommodation, restaurants, phone conversations and so on.  The content covers personal information, communication for survival, daily life, learning and working, social activities, etc. focusing on satisfying the basic needs for communication in daily life. 

Chinese 2 A/B


The main objective of Chinese 2 is to improve students' basic Chinese listening, speaking, reading and writing skills and prepare them for higher levels of learning. The content is divided into three parts: communicative elements, communicative progression and communicative fluency. After class, the practice of expression is very important to improve students' communicative ability and language ability in listening, speaking, reading, writing and translation.

Course Name

Course Description

Health/P.E. A&B


This course involves the learning of skills, the acquisition of knowledge and the development of attitudes through movement. The goal of physical education is to develop physically educated individuals who have the knowledge, skills, and confidence to enjoy a lifetime of healthful physical activity.

 

 

AP Courses Offered at GPA

The following is a list of current and previously offered AP courses at GPA.

  • AP Biology
  • AP Calculus AB
  • AP Psychology
  • AP Macroeconomics
  • AP Microeconomics
  • AP Chemistry
  • AP Computer Science Principles

Advanced Placement Policy

 

GPA offers Advanced Placement (AP) courses in order to help upper-level high school students with the opportunity to take on college-level coursework. AP classes are offered yearly, but not all classes are offered every year.

In order for students to take AP courses, they must meet the following requirements:

  1. Be in 11th or 12th grade. 10th graders may also take AP courses, but must consult with the school counselor and get approval before taking the course.
  2. Have a minimum grade point average of 3.0 
  3. Taken the prerequisite courses for the following courses:

AP Biology → Must have taken Biology

AP Chemistry → Must have taken Chemistry

Students taking AP courses will get priority in signing up for AP exams (in May of the school year). Students are required to pay for the exam fees if they decide to take the AP exams. Exam registrations will be done through the school counselor.

 

*Affected by September 2020

Online Learning

In order to offer greater choice and flexibility to our students, GPA offers qualifying students the opportunity to take some courses online via an approved provider. The purpose of taking an online class is:

  • To offer additional courses unavailable in GPA’s course catalog
  • To fix scheduling conflicts that cannot be resolved any other way
  • Credit recovery, when a student needs to retake a course they have failed (available during vacations only)
  • Acceleration of a student’s academic track (by special permission only)

Online courses are not intended to:

  • Give a student a “free” period
  • Help students graduate early
  • Allow a student to avoid having a class with a particular teacher they don’t like 

To qualify for an online course, a student must:

  • Have a minimum grade point average of 3.0 (with the exception of credit recovery)
  • Be in grades 10-12 (9th grade students may be approved by exception)
  • Not be a new student (must have completed at least 1 full semester at GPA)
  • Receive approval from the counselor, principal, and in some cases, the teachers of the relevant department(s) prior to registering for the course
    • This approval is subjective and based on these parties’ level of confidence that the student has the academic skills and self-discipline required to complete an online course.
    • Foreign Language online courses have different qualifications and the student must discuss with the school counselor and receive permission from both the school counselor and principal in order to take the course(s).

 

Failing online courses:

If a student fails an online course (not for credit recovery), they will no longer be eligible to take online courses during the semester. They may have to take a remedial course online in order to receive the lost credit, but this will be done during either winter or summer break and the expense will be on the student.